These courses examine the consequences of choices in designing, building, and renovating structures with an eye toward protecting human health,

Topics include methods, practices, benefits and drawbacks found in 100-year-old homes, between-the great-wars homes, homes built in the 50s, 60s, 70s, 80s, 90s, and the 21st century.

Our homes protect us from outside elements, but there are also indoor elements that can negatively impact our health. They will vary with the age of the home, as different construction techniques over the years created unique air quality concerns unique to that time. This course will lead you to understand the various construction details over the last 100+ years, homeowners and tenants can make better choices to ensure great air quality within their living spaces.

Topics include Building Biology Principles, scaling to the ideal size, city sate to mega-city, geomancy, centralized versus decentralized solutions, ailing city/garden city.

How do we define and create “well-planned” communities? How can we meet the needs of community, families and individuals of all ages? These are the questions we will explore throughout the Community Planning set of four module courses, and particularly in “Cities in Crisis,” where we examine the beginnings of human settlement in Europe, the growth of the city and the planning theories that shaped the built world up until the time of Bau-Biologie’s formation in Germany in the 1960’s.

Topics include modern urban design guidelines, defining City as Place, greening cities, natural ecological solutions, renewables, flood planning, solar ordinance,

In this course we examine exemplary case studies that realize Building Biology criteria for healthier cities. Some of the guidelines that are photographically documented include capturing the essence of character that is unique to a city, and creating vital public spaces. Other examples focus on environmental conditions, such as greening urban areas, managing traffic with a balance of mixed uses, managing rainwater ecologically, and integrating renewable energy and energy reduction into communities.

Topics include new urbanism, transit-oriented development, co-housing, commons solutions, ecohoods, pocket neighborhoods, transition movement and its principles

How do we reconcile human health and ecological living in our cities today with the challenges of air, land and water pollution, the automobile, social problems, and zoning restrictions? How do we define and create “well-planned” communities? How can we meet the needs of community, families and individuals of all ages? This course explores the answers to those and many more fundamental community planning questions.

Topics include space-specific urban guidelines, vitality of public spaces, inviting nature back in, mitigating negative vehicular traffic, rainwater management, energy reduction.

At the time of the original building biology writings in the 1970s, city planning theory had resulted in a new sort of ailment. The worst slums of the industrial revolution (at least in Western Europe and North America) had been successfully sanitized through slum clearing, and the implementation of draconian zoning laws.  But the post war cities then suffered from a new form of ailment characterized by sterility and alienation. Zoning laws and city plans based on the automobile created great separations between work, schools, shopping and homes. Dominated by the implementation of unproven and simplistic theories of urban renewal that were widely adopted, the very fabric that makes a great city great was completely ignored. This course makes the case that these experiments should be unanimously declared to be failures.

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Topics include standards for Building Biology Testing Methods, design for low radiation, sheilding and Earthing, power systems, grounding issues, appliances, electronic devices.

It all began in New York, in 1884, but now the entire country is covered with a network of power lines and steeped in its barely audible buzzing sound. Today we have so many users that the broad electromagnetic spectrum seems to have run out of space. To ensure that all electrical appliances and electronic devices can run simultaneously without impeding each other’s function, the Federal Communication Commission issued rules and regulations regarding their electromagnetic compatibility (EMC). Unfortunately, regulatory thinking stops there: biological systems are not included in the equation. This course covers the issue of electromagnetic interference (EMI) among and between devices, as well as the biological compatibility of those technologies.